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with the members of the political elite in afghanistan and of course there are many things they do that they don't tell me about. but i have observed a huge change in the past 13 years in their relations with each other something which isn't often commented on 13 years ago they didn't know each other. their relations were yelling at each other over the radio. now including the people who are political, they all know each other and have worked together. prior to the election all of the candidates were running with each other and met each other extensively to talk about the rules for the game and how to resolve it and i'm confident that however disputed the outcome may be those people with their relations with each other and the right international support will be able to find some kind of a settlement even if many of them were not that happy with it. we have a lot of experts in this audience, which is great. >> thank you barbara and to the panel. i have a two-part question the first one directed to fatemeh talking about the pakistan iran pipeline. there have been concerns if and when the pipeline
was a college geography professor. it's important to make sure that you have a sense of place. if you don't have a cognitive map of afghanistan running through your head, try to get to where you can see. afghanistan's issues about life and livelihood are tied to water. it is a landlocked country. it happens to be the headwaters 25 systems that move into -- to five systems that move into asia and pakistan. water flows downstream, except when it flows towards money. that was a saying when i taught school in colorado. that was one of our comments about the colorado river. you can redirect water, use it to death without monitoring it. unless you know the cost benefits, you don't know that what you are doing is sustainable. one of the topics i'm working on right now as a research scientist for the army corps of engineers has to do with water security and sovereign state stability. to stabilize the population's movement, to support agriculture, generate energy, and sustain public health, you need water. it underpins the essential services that a country citizen expects of an established government. af
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